Iconic Places Around The World: Then And Now

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Some of the world’s most famous tourist attractions have been around for hundreds, even thousands, of years. As time passes, our world goes through many technological advancements and physical changes. This is directly reflected in what our cities end up looking like. Have you ever wondered what some of the world’s famous places looked like a hundred years ago? Read on to have a look at some of the most well-known locations and just how much they have changed throughout the years.

Shanghai Now

As one of the fastest growing cities in China and the world, Shanghai certainly has changed significantly. It now boasts an impressive skyline, including the Shanghai Tower, which is China’s tallest building and also the second tallest skyscraper in the world. Pudong is the district that is home to the famous Luijazui skyline, located on a peninsula that is located in the bend of the Huangpu River. It sits directly across from the old business and financial districts of the Bund, a central waterfront area of Shanghai.

places then and now

Shanghai 1987

Nearly thirty years ago, Shanghai’s city skyline did not have much to boast. However, this city is the world’s fastest growing one, so it did not take too long for this picture to change dramatically. The city sits on the Yangtze River and borders Jiangsu and Zhejiang, two provinces. As the industrial center of the country that hosted the skilled industrial workers, Shanghai became a radical leftist center beginning in the 1950’s. It saw a tumultuous time of cultural revolution but remained economically strong despite this.

places then and now

Lincoln Memorial Now

One hundred years later, and the Lincoln Memorial looks as good as ever. The entire place has been completely redone and features a lake, greenery, and paved ways into the memorial itself. Inside the memorial is the famous statue of the man himself, Abraham Lincoln. It was sculpted by Daniel Chester French, and it took him about four years to create. The statue was meant to stand ten feet tall originally, but it was decided that it would stand nineteen feet tall in the end. That means that if Lincoln were standing up, he would be twenty eight feet tall!

places then and now

Lincoln Memorial 1917

The Lincoln Memorial was built in order to commemorate Abraham Lincoln, the 16th President of the United States. The memorial used to be situated right in the middle of a swamp. It’s crazy to think that this was only around 100 years ago. The exterior portion of the monument is reminiscent of a Greek temple in style, featuring a  peristyle made up of thirty six Doric columns, each representing a state, since there were only thirty six states in the Union when Lincoln died.

places then and now

Times Square Now

Times Square is often referred to as “The Center of the Universe,” and understandably so. It has become the second most visited location in the world, and it’s sheer size, grandeur, and larger-than-life feel definitely is remarkable. On a daily basis, nearly 330,000 people walk through the square, many of which are tourists. The busiest days see nearly 460,000 visitors through Times Square. Surprisingly, Times Square is actually shaped like two triangles, or something like a bowtie shape, rather than a square.

places then and now

Times Square 1922

Even a hundred years ago, Times Square was a hustling and bustling central spot. Although a lot less high-tech, it was still used as a major commercial intersection. It was originally called Longacre Square but was renamed to Times Square in 1904 when The New York Times headquarters was moved to the Time building in the square, which is where the New Year’s Eve ball drop is located each year. This tradition began on December 31st, 1907 and continues through to today.

places then and now

Las Vegas Strip Now

The new millennium brought in a new era to the Vegas Strip, which saw the opening of the Venetian, Bellagio, Wynn, and Encore resorts. These brought luxury and high-end vacationing to Vegas, meanwhile older hotels and resorts began renovating and adding in expansions in order to up the ante. Some of the theme hotels decided to do away with themes altogether in order to bring in more high-end clientele. More recently in 2016, newer additions such as Lucky Dragon Hotel and Casino and the T-Mobile Area opened up.

places then and now

Las Vegas Strip 1960

The Las Vegas Strip looked very different nearly 60 years ago. Situated in the desert of Nevada, it once was very bare. The first casino that opened on what is now the Strip was the El Rancho Vegas, but the first casino to be built in Vegas was the Pair-o-Dice Club, which opened in 1931. New York mobster Bugsy Siegel began  to be interested in the center, which meant hotels and resorts like the Flamingo and Desert Inn opened up in 1950 thanks to his financial involvement. A Los Angeles police officer actually named the Las Vegas Strip after the Sunset Strip in L.A.

places then and now

San Francisco Now

In the late 60’s and early 70’s, San Francisco experienced much growth and what was called “Manhattanization,” which included much development in downtown San Fran. Thanks to the internet industry, since the early 2000’s San Francisco has experienced two booms. The first was what was called the dot-com boom combined with the increase in startup companies led to an invigorated economy in the city. In the mid-2000’s the social media boom began and allowed San Francisco, and more specifically Silicon Valley, to become a popular location for tech offices such as Apple and Google.

places then and now

San Francisco 1906

San Francisco is the financial, cultural, and commercial center located in Northern California. In 1906, San Francisco suffered much damage due to a major earthquake that struck. Since buildings collapsed and gas lines were ruptured, fires were ignited that burned for many days uncontrollably. Nearly three quarters of the city was destroyed, including much of the downtown area. However, rebuilding came very quickly. Many neighborhoods were upgraded, including Pacific Heights, which became a very wealthy neighborhood afterwards. After this, the city became a financial capital.

places then and now

Seattle Now

In the 1980’s Seattle’s prosperity became to rise once again. Microsoft’s move from New Mexico to Belleview, Washington ,which is very close to Seattle, brought many other technology companies into the area. Some of these companies include giants such as: Amazon.com, RealNetworks, Nintendo America, AT&T Mobility, T-Mobile, and many others. This success saw Seattle’s population increase by 50,000 in only ten years, therefore making the real estate in the city one of the most expensive in the country. The film Sleepless in Seattle brought even more national attention to the city.

places then and now

Seattle 1970’s

After World War I, Seattle’s economy took a turn south. However, in the 1970’s, things looked up after Boeing’s growth in the commercial airliner market. Success did not last long, unfortunately. With the oil crises combined with losses of Government contracts along with costs and delays of the Boeing 747, people began to leave the area and the city became deserted. It got so bad that local real estate agents put of a billboard sign that said: “Will the last person leaving Seattle — Turn out the lights.”

places then and now

Tokyo Now

Tokyo has implemented an earthquake resistant infrastructure, so recent natural disasters in the surrounding area caused very little damage to the city. In 2020, Tokyo will host the Summer Olympics, marking it the first city in Asia to host the Olympic Games two times. Today, Tokyo is the most populous city of Japan, as well as being the capital city. According to the Safe Cities Index, Tokyo is in first place for safest city in the world, however it is also considered one of the most expensive cities in the world.

places then and now

Tokyo 1945

The bombing of Tokyo in both 1944 and 1945 brought much destruction to the city, claiming somewhere between 75,000 to 200,000 civilians and causing significant damage to half of the city. However, the city bounced back rather quickly, seeing the city being rebuilt in nearly ten years. Tokyo hosted the 1964 Olympics and showcased its improved state. In the 70’s, new high-rise developments were built, as well as a new airport in Narita. The population also rose to 11 million people in the metropolitan area.

places then and now

Dubai Now

In as little as thirty years, the Dubai skyline has changed dramatically. It is currently the most populous city in the United Arab Emirates. As it has grown, Dubai has established itself as a business hub in the Middle East and a global city. Most of the revenues of the city come in from tourism, aviation, real estate, and also financial services. It is also home to the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa, that stands at 2,722 feet tall. With all of its luxury, Dubai ranks as the 2nd most expensive city in the Middle East.

places then and now

Dubai 1980

Dubai began to grow in the 1970’s from revenue generated from trade and soil, despite a large influx of immigration due to the Lebanese civil war. Only in 1979 did the dispute between the emirates regarding borders end and a formal compromise was finally made. The Jebel Ali port was built in that same year and in 1985 the Jebel Ali Free Zone was added so foreign goods could be imported and local goods could be exported freely. The aviation industry also grew during this time.

places then and now

Tower Bridge Now

Two bridge towers are connected by two horizontal walkways. In 1977, the bridge was painted red, white, and blue, in honor of Queen Elizabeth’s 25th year anniversary of the ascension to the throne, named the Silver Jubilee. While the bridge deck has free access to vehicles as well as pedestrians, the bridge’s twin towers provide access to Victorian engine rooms and high-level walkways, which are accessible to visitors as well. During the 2012 London Olympics, a set of Olympic rings were added to the bridge to mark the start of the games.

places then and now

Tower Bridge 1892

The Tower Bridge built over the River Thames in London is a combination of a bascule and suspension bridge. It was built between the years of 1886 and 1894 and has become a symbol of London. Construction took five major contractors: Sir John Jackson, Baron Armstrong, William Webster, Sir H.H. Bartlett, and Sir William Arrol & Co. The construction employed 432 construction workers total.  It was opened officially on June 30th, 1894 by The Prince of Wales, future King Edward VII.

places then and now

Eiffel Tower Now

There are three levels that visitors can access, and the first and second levels even feature restaurants. The highest level is 906 feet above ground and can be accessed by foot or by elevator. It is currently the highest observation deck that can be visited in the European Union. Visitors who decide to make the ascension by foot are agreeing to take over 600 steps from the ground level up to the second level, and then an elevator is usually taken from the second level to the third.

places then and now

Eiffel Tower 1888

The Eiffel Tower is an iron lattice towel in Paris, France, that was constructed between the years 1887 and 1889 in honor of the 1889 World’s Fair that was held in Paris between May and October 1889. It is named after Gustave Eiffel, since his company built and designed it. Initially, many of France’s leading artists criticized the tower’s  design, but it has now become a global cultural icon. Standing at 1,063 feet tall, which equals an 81-story building, it is Paris’s tallest structure.

places then and now

Golden Gate Bridge Now

The Golden Gate Bridge connects the city of San Francisco to Marin County. It is considered to be one of the Wonders of the Modern World and is often featured in many films and television shows. Some of its most notable appearances include the opening credits of popular television sitcom Full House, and later its spinoff, Fuller House, as well as films such as 2012, Mrs. Doubtfire, Dawn of Planet of the Apes, Interview With a Vampire, and The Day the Earth Stood Still.
places then and now

Golden Gate Bridge 1930’s

The Golden Gate Bride is a mile-wide suspension bridge that spans over the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay and is three miles long. It overlooks Alcatraz Island as well. Construction for the Golden Gate Bridge began in 1933. The bridge ended up costing 35 million dollars, which was actually 1.3 million dollars under budget. It was also completed ahead of schedule, being fully finished in May 1937. The McClintic-Marshall Construction Company was in charge of the construction of the bridge.

places then and now

Miami Now

After some turmoil in the 80’s and 90’s due to drug wars, a huge influx in immigration from Latin America and Haiti, as well as damage from Hurricane Andrew, Miami finally saw growth as a major world city. It has become a center internationally, financially, and culturally. It is currently second after El Paso, Texas in Spanish-speaking majority cities in the United States. It is also the city that holds that largest Cuban-American plurality in the country. In only 110 years, Miami’s population has multiplied from 1000 residents to 5.5 million residents.

places then and now

Miami 1930’s

Miami was hit by a historic hurricane aptly named the “Great Miami” Hurricane in 1926, which ended up being the most expensive damage toll in the U.S. which, after inflation adjustment, ended up costing $165 billion. World War II brought a military base for the US to fight against German submarines, which in tow brought an increased population to the area. When Fidel Castro rose to power in 1959, a significant amount of Cubans chose to seek refuge in Miami and brought much cultural influence to the city.

places then and now

Copley Square Now

In 1991, a new fountain was added and the new Copley Square Park was added to the square.The official landmarks that are located in Copley include Trinity Church, John Hancock Tower, Old South Church, Boston Public Library. Since 1986, the Boston Marathon has finished at Copley Square, and in 1996 a monument dedicated to the 100th race was erected, located inside the park by Boylston and Dartmouth streets. In 2013, the Boston Marathon bombings took place near the Boston Public Library. The attack left at least 183 people injured and claimed three lives.

places then and now

Copley Square 1910

Before it was named Copley Square, the cultural center was actually named the Art Square. It was later renamed to Copley Square, after artist John Singleton Copley. Many cultural and educational institutions used to be adjacent to the center, including the Museum of Fine Arts, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the New England Museum of Natural History, and the Boston Public Library. Up until 1966, it was cut diagonally by Huntington Avenue. In 1966, the avenue was truncated and the square was then paved partially.

places then and now

Ponte Vecchio Now

The shops that can be seen from the riverside are called retrobotteghe (literally “back stores”) and were added on in the 17th century. Although butchers used to initially occupy the shops, these days it is more common to see jewelers, artists and art dealers, musicians, and souvenir sellers on the bridge. The bridge’s adjacent bridges are Ponte Santa Trinita and Ponte alle Grazie, that were reconstructed after being completely damaged by the Germans in World War II. The bridge is 98 feet long.

places then and now

Ponte Vecchio 1944

The Ponte Vecchio, whose name literally translates to “Old Bridge” in Italian, was built around 900 AC, over the Arno River in Florence, Italy. Since it was built, it hosted shops and merchants that would sell their goods on tables on the bridge. It was the only bridge that was not demolished by the Germans during World War II. Allegedly, it was an express order by Hitler to spare the Ponte Vecchio, though the damage to the buildings surrounding the bridge blocked access to the bridge.

places then and now

Disneyland Now


Casa de Fritos was an operation in Disneyland during the 60’s. They created “Doritos” (which is Spanish for “little golden things”) in order to recycle old tortillas that would otherwise have been thrown away. They were so popular that they started being sold regionally and eventually nationally by 1966. By the 1990’s, the park was being expanded. Disneyland Park and Disneyland Hotel were combined along with the original parking lot and have become the Disneyland Resort. In July 2015, the park celebrated 60 years of being open.

places then and now

Disneyland 1954

Walt Disney envisioned opening a theme park after visiting an amusement park with his two daughters, Sharon and Diane. He originally thought about opening a park at Walt Disney Studios, but decided against it, thinking that a functional movie studio was not interesting for fans to visit. Construction of Disneyland began on July 16, 1954. The whole park cost $17 million to build and one year to complete. U.S. Route 1 (Now Interstate 5) was being built at the same time, and two lanes were added in anticipation of traffic for the park.

places then and now

Tel Aviv Now

Since Tel Aviv comprises the largest concentration of International Style buildings (which include Bauhaus and other modernist architectural styles), in 2003, UNESCO named Tel Aviv’s White City as a World Heritage Site. Tel Aviv is the Middle East’s third-largest economy, as it is a focal point in the world of high tech and is known as the “Silicon Wadi.” It is also known for its vibrant nightlife and non-stop 24 hour culture, called “The City that Never Sleeps,” and often tops lists of “best party cities” in the world.

places then and now

Tel Aviv 1948

Tel Aviv was founded next to the port city Jaffa by Jewish immigrants in 1909. Modern Tel Aviv’s first neighborhoods were already established in 1886, the oldest being Neve Tzedek, which is around to this day. The increasing amounts of Jewish refugees coming in meant the city’s population grew at a vast rate, quickly outpacing the population of neighboring Jaffa. The State of Israel was officially established in 1948, and by 1950, Tel Aviv and Jaffa merged into one municipality, called Tel Aviv-Yafo.

places then and now

Jerusalem Now

Jerusalem is also a cultural center, housing many cultural and artistic venues. The Israel Museum in Jerusalem accrues around one million visitors per year and compromises several buildings that house collections of Judaica, Israeli and European art, archaeological findings, as well as the Dead Sea scrolls. The national cemetery of Israel is located on Mount Herzl and is next to Yad Vashem, Israel’s national memorial for the victims of the Holocaust. In it, there are around 100,000 books and articles pertaining to the Holocaust, making it the largest library of information that is related to the Holocaust.

places then and now

Jerusalem 1877

Jerusalem is the capital city of the State of Israel and is one of the oldest cities in the world. Around 2400 BCE, in ancient cuneiform, it was called “Urusalima,” which means “City of Peace.” It is considered to be a holy city in each of the major Abrahamic religions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The Old City of Jerusalem is known for many seminal religious site, such as Temple Mount and the Western Wall, The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, the Dome of the Rock, and al-Aqsa Mosque.

places then and now

Pike Place Market Now

Pike Place Market is best known for two attractions. The first is the Pike Place Fish Market. When a customer requests a fish to order, an employee takes an ice-covered three-foot fish and throws it over the countertop so that another employee would catch it to prep it for the sale. The second attraction is certainly the most famous. The very first Starbucks Store opened at the market in 1971 and was then moved to its famous location on 1912 Pike Place which is there until today.

places then and now

Pike Place Market 1907

The public market that opened in 1907 overlooks the Elliott Bay waterfront in Seattle, Washington. The market was opened up after farmers grew tired of selling their goods through wholesalers and receiving only a percentage on the final sale. On the first day the market opened, only about 10 farmers showed up, since there had been rumors of boycotts and violence. However, hundreds of customers showed up and the farmers’ produce quickly sold out. In only four years, demand grew so much that the number of stalls at the market had doubled.

places then and now

Central Park Now

Central Park is considered a National Historic Landmark and was designated so in 1962 by the U.S. Department of the Interior. The park is managed by Central Park Conservancy, which is a non-profit organization that provides a majority of the $65 million budget the park gets each year. That budget contributes to the basic care and needs of the massive park. The park is home to twenty nine sculptures by artists such as Augustus Saint-Gaudens, Emma Stebbins, and John Quincy Adams Ward.

places then and now

Central Park 1850’s

Central Park is the most visited park in the United States. It garners over 40 million visitors per year, and is one of the most filmed places in the world. It was founded in 1857 on a 778 acre space in the city. Landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted and architect Calvert Vaux won a design contest in order to expand and improve on the park. It was first publicly opened in 1858, and by 1873 was completely finished and was expanded to its current size of 843 acres.

places then and now

Grand Central Station Now

Grand Central Station is home to many fast food chains and restaurants in its interior. Additionally, its home to bakeries, newsstands, delis, food markets, and even retail stores. These include large corporations including a Shake Shack, Starbucks, a Rite Aid, and an Apple Store. The basement of Grand Central Station covers 49 acres and is one of the largest basements in the entire city. The station was built with architectural details reminiscent of Greek and Roman architecture, including facades featuring representations of Roman gods Minerva, Hercules, and Mercury.

places then and now

Grand Central Station 1901

Grand Central Terminal, also known as Grand Central Station or just Grand Central, is a commuter and rapid transit terminal located at 42nd Street and Park Avenue in Manhattan. It was named after and built by the New York Central and Hudson River Railroad. It is one of the ten most visited tourist locations in the world, attracting around 21.6 million visitors in a year. The whole station spans over 48 acres and currently has 44 platforms, the most of any railroad station in the world.

places then and now

Washington Monument Now

In 2011, the Virginia earthquake, as well as Hurricane Irene, caused damage to the obelisk monument. The park was closed down in order to be assessed and fixed. Repairs took 32 months, and the monument reopened in May 2014. In September 2016, the monument was closed once again due to problems relating to the reliability of the elevator system. It was determined that the elevator needed to be modernized and the monument will remain closed until 2019. The project will cost between $2 million to $3 million to complete.

places than and now

Washington Monument 1860

The Washington Monument’s construction began in 1848, however the construction was halted in 1854 since there was a lack of funding as well as intervention due to the American Civil War. Construction resumed in 1877 and was completed in 1884, though it was officially dedicated in 1885. It opened to the public in 1888, and was the tallest structure in the world at the time until 1889, when the Eiffel Tower was completed and took that title for itself.

places than and now

Big Ben Now

The tower is officially named Elizabeth Tower, as it was renamed in honor of the Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II in 2012, which marked her 60th anniversary of the ascension to the throne. Before then, it was simply called the Clock Tower. The clock was made by clockmaker Ian Westworth in 1859 and he said that it is “the prince of timekeepers, the biggest, most accurate four-faced striking and chiming clock in the world.” 2009 marked its 150th anniversary, and celebrations followed.

places than and now

Big Ben 1860’s

Big Ben refers to the Great Bell of the clock located at the north end of the Palace of Westminster in London. The bell tower was added on to the new Westminster Palace after the original Palace of Westminster was destroyed by fire in 1834. It was designed by Charles Barry and later was taken over by Augutus Pugin. The clock tower was built in a Gothic Revival style and stands 315 feet high. The interior of the tower is not open to the public apart from United Kingdom residents, despite the fact that it is one of the most visited tourist attractions in the world.

places than and now

Faneuil Hall Now

Faneuil Hall was named the 4th most visited tourist site out of the top 25 in the United States in 2008 by Forbes Traveler. Faneuil hall now is a part of the larger festival marketplace, which consists of three large granite buildings that include North Market, Quincy Market, and South Market. It includes an outdoor and indoor market and many food stalls. The whole market was designed by Benjamin Thompson and Associates and its popularity in the 1970’s inspired many other such complexes to be built in the U.S.

places than and now

Faneuil Hall 1903

Faneuil Hall has been a meeting hall as well as a marketplace in Boston, Massachusetts, since 1743. Many notable speeches were made at Faneuil Hall, for example, speeches by James Otis, Samuel Adams, and many more who believed in independence from Great Britain. It is referred to as “the Cradle of Liberty,” and is a park of both the Freedom Trail as well as the Boston National Historical Park. It is also closely located to Government Center and the waterfront.

places than and now

Forbidden City Now

The palace has influenced architectural designs throughout East Asia. In 1987, the palace was marked as a World Heritage Site. UNESCO has designated it as the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the whole world. The palace now serves as the Palace Museum and is home to artwork and artifacts that have been collected since the time of the Qing and Ming dynasties. It is the most visited museum in the world, attracting over 14.6 million visitors annually.

places than and now

Forbidden City 1900

The Forbidden City was once the palace for the Ming dynasty through to the Qing dynasty in Beijing, China. It was designated as a palace between the years of 1420 to 1912. It was both the home of the emperors and the ceremonial and also political center of the Chinese government for nearly five hundred years. Construction of the palace took place from 1406 and was completed in 1420. It is made up of 980 buildings that span over 72 acres total.

places than and now

Bourbon Street Now

Jazz is said to have been born in the red-light district in the French Quarter, which was also known for vaudeville acts, prostitution, and gambling. Famous jazz artists such as Jelly Roll Morton and King Oliver provided music and entertainment at brothels. Hurricane Katrina severely affected New Orleans, but Bourbon Street was not so severely affected since it is located on a high-ground location in the French Quarter. However, since it is a tourist hub, it was given major attention for renovation.

places than and now

Bourbon Street 1900

Bourbon Street is located in the center of the French Quarter in the city of New Orleans in Louisiana. It goes on for thirteen blocks beginning from Canal Street all the way to Esplanade Avenue. The street’s history gives much insight to the history of New Orleans in general. In the 1880’s, the rise of brothels and bars brought much criticism to the local Creoles living in the city. At the same time, the city’s best known restaurants were also founded.

places than and now

Sydney Opera House Now

The Sydney Opera House houses several resident companies. These include: Sydney Symphony Orchesra, Sydney Theatre Company, The Australian Ballet, and Opera Australia. By 2007, the Sydney Opera House was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The building complex cost around $102 million (Australian Dollars) to build, which after inflation, today would come out to around $915 million (Australian Dollars). All of the performance venues combined can seat a total of 5,738 audience members. The building is currently managed by the Sydney Opera House Trust.

places than and now

Sydney Opera House 1960’s

The Sydney Opera house was actually designed by a Danish architect named Jorn Utzon. It was built starting from 1957 and was officially opened in 1973. It is located by Sydney Harbour, situated between Sydney Cove and Farm Cove. Despite its misleading name, the building is actually made up of several venues rather than one. The performing arts center hosts over 1500 shows per, which accrues over 1.2 million audience members throughout the year. Over 8 million people visit the whole site annually.

places than and now

Sagrada Familia Now

Gaudi spent his last years dedicated to this project and at the time of his death in 1926, less than a quarter of the church was constructed. Progress halted due to the Spanish Civil War and resumed again in the 1950’s. In 2010, building reached only the halfway point. To this day, construction is still going on. It is projected to be finished in 2026, which is exactly one hundred years after Guadi passed away. It is meant to stand 560 feet tall after completion and is meant to have 18 spires total, with only 8 completed so far.

places than and now

Sagrada Familia 1910’s

The Basilica i Temple Expiatori de la Sagrada Familia, more colloquially referred to as just Sagrada Familia, is a Roman Catholic church found in Barcelona, Spain. It was designed by the famous Catalan architect Antoni Gaudi. The construction of the church began in 1882 and by 1883, Gaudi became the lead architect in charge, taking over Francisco Paula de Villar’s position. Gaudi combined two very different styles of architecture in his design, mixing Gothic and curvilinear Art Nouveau forms in his design.

places than and now

Manhattan Bridge Now

There are four subway tracks that connect to the lower side of the bridge. In 1984, a major repair program was implemented, which led to many changes in train traffic, including some of the busiest tracks such as the north tracks. The reopening was slated for 1995, but the south side was only reopened in July of 2001. The north side was then closed once again, only to be reopened in 2004. The south tracks were once again closed in 2013 due to damage caused by Hurricane Sandy.

places than and now

Manhattan Bridge 1909

The Manhattan Bridge connects Downtown Brooklyn at the Flatbush Avenue Extension to Lower Manhattan, more specifically at Canal Street. It is a suspension bridge that was built over the East River in New York City. The innovative design was created by Leon Moisseiff and is considered to the one of the first bridges of modern suspension bridge. It also served as a model for many bridges built later in the first half of the twentieth century. It was the first of its kind to include a Warren truss in the design.

places than and now

Moulin Rouge Now

The cancan dance is said to have been created at the Moulin Rouge. It was originally a sensual dance introduced by the courtesans at the cabaret but has turned into an entertainment form that has helped grow the cabaret industry all over Europe. The Moulin Rouge is one of the world’s most visited tourist attractions, and still holds entertainment of music and dance for visitors that come from all around the world. The cabaret is located next to the Blanche metro station in Paris.

places then and now

Moulin Rouge 1906

The Moulin Rouge, French for “Red Mill,” is a cabaret located in the eighteenth arrondissement in Paris, France. The original Moulin Rouge was co-founded by Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller in 1889, but it burned down in 1915. The rebuilt Moulin Rouge officially opened in 1921. The cabaret was well known for cancan dancing, extravagant shows, and attracting many prominent artists of the time. Toulouse-Lautrec was known for attending the cabaret and even created many paintings that portrayed the club.

places then and now

Cairo Now

Cairo’s nickname is called “the city of a thousand minarets,” since it has so many structures that feature Islamic architecture. It is home to the second oldest institute for higher education in the world, the Al-Azhar University. Cairo has a metro system, which is one of only two in all of Africa, the other one being located in Algiers, Algeria. The metro in Cairo is the fifteenth busiest in the world, averaging around one billion passengers per year.

places then and now

Cairo 1940

Cairo is the capital city of Egypt, as well was the largest city in the country. It is the largest metropolitan area in the Middle East and also the Arab world. It is the fifteenth largest city in the world. Modern Cairo was founded by Jawhar al-Siqilli of the Fatimid dynasty in 969 CE. Present day Cairo is located near the focal point of Ancient Egypt, particularly because it’s located so close to the Nile River. Egyptians call the city by the Arabic name for Egypt itself, to signify how important the city is.

places then and now

Gdansk Now

Gdansk is located on the southernmost edge of the Baltic Sea, by Gdansk Bay. The population of the city is around 460,000, which makes it the largest city in the Pomerania region of Poland, which is found in the North. Most of the city was rebuilt during the 1950’s and 1960’s due to the fact that the majority of the city was destroyed during the war. All traces of German influence were completely avoided in the rebuilding of the city and instead French, Italian, and Flemish styles were incorporated.

places then and now

Gdansk 1940’s

Gdansk is a Polish city found on the Baltic coast, and is the capital of Poland’s main seaport. During the interwar time period, it was a part of a disputed region between the Weimar Republic, Poland, and Nazi Germany. This was due to the fact that the city had a multiethnic population and history. The invasion of Poland and the first clash of the Second World War took place just outside Gdansk’s city limit. It is also the birthplace of the Solidarity movement, which later brought an end to Communist rule in Poland.

places then and now

Parc Guell Now

Parc Guell was named as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1984, filed under “Works of Antoni Gaudi.” Must of Gaudi’s organic style can be found throughout the park. Many mythological elements can also be found in the park’s style, which was important to Gaudi and Guell, since they modeled much of these elements from their main inspiration, the Temple of Apollo in Delphi, found in Greece. Although originally developed to be a housing development, it is now a municipal garden.

places then and now

Parc Guell 1902

Parc Guell is a public park found in Barcelona, Spain, located on Carmel Hill, which is a part of the Collserola mountain range. It is made up of architectonic elements as well as gardens. The park was designed by Antoni Gaudi, who designed many other spaces in Barcelona and was highly regarded for his work in Catalan modernism. Construction of the park began in 1900 and was completed in 1914. However, it was only open to the public in 1926.

places then and now

Pyramids at Giza Now

The Pyramid of Khufu is also known as the Pyramid of Cheops and also the Great Pyramid. Also in Giza are the Pyramid of Khafre and the Pyramid of Menkaure, that are both smaller, the latter being one of the smaller pyramids in general. Next to them are smaller structures that are known as the “Queen’s pyramids.” The Pyramid of Khufu was built between around 2589 BC and 2566 BC.

places then and now

Pyramids at Giza 1862

The Egyptian pyramids were originally built as tombs for pharaohs as well as their consorts. These were built during the Old and Middle Kingdom periods of Ancient Egypt. The most famous pyramids are the ones located in Giza, just outside of Cairo. Some of these are some of the biggest structures that were ever built. The largest of the pyramids is the Pyramid of Khufu, which is the last remaining of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.

places then and now

Statue of Liberty Now

The Statue of Liberty holds a tabula ansata, which is a tablet that evokes the law, with the date of the American Independence written on it, July 4 1776. There is a broken chain that can be found at her feet, which represents The United States’s break into freedom. She is also a sign to welcome immigrants who come from abroad. The statue stands at 151 feet and was dedicated on October 28, 1886.

places then and now

Statue of Liberty 1880’s

The Statue of Liberty, also called the “Liberty Enlightening the World,” after the French name, “La Liberte eclairant le monde,” is a neoclassical sculpture that is currently located on Liberty Island in New York Harbor of New York City. The statue was designed by Frederic Auguste Batholdi and built by Gustave Eiffel, who built the Eiffel Tower, as a gift to the United States from France. The statue depicts a robed female figure that is meant to represent the Roman goddess Libertas, representing freedom.

places then and now

Great Barrier Reef Now

The Great Barrier Reef is a popular tourist destination, as well as the nearby region, and together they accrue $3 billion a year. In March 2016, a report was published that revealed that coral bleaching has been affecting the reef much more seriously than previously was believed, and has seriously damaged the northern parts of the reef. It is also due the warming of the temperatures in the ocean. In November 2014, Google released a Google Underwater Street View which allowed people to view the reef in 3D online. .

places then and now

Great Barrier Reef Early 2000’s

The Great Barrier Reef is the largest coral reef system found in the world, which is made up of nearly 3000 individual reefs and also 900 islands that span on 1400 miles. It can be found in the Coral Sea near Queensland, Australia. It is so large, it can be seen from space and is the largest structure in the world that has been made up by living organisms, which are called coral polyps. Billions of tiny coral polyps make up the structure.

places then and now

Aleppo Now

Aleppo has long been a cultural center, being named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1986 and having had many ancient structures preserved for hundreds of years. However, due to the Syrian Civil War, the city has largely been destroyed. The battle of Aleppo in 2012 brought the most destruction to the city, and has become the most affected city in the civil war. Government forces have recently managed to take control of the city back from rebel forces, allowing the government to fully reclaim the city.

places than and now

Aleppo 2008

Aleppo is the capital of the Aleppo Governorate, the most populous Syrian governorate in the whole country. During the Ottoman Empire, it was the third largest city, just behind Cairo and Constantinople. It was once one of the largest cities located in the Levant before the intervention of the Syrian Civil War. Aleppo is an old metropolis and one of the few oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. There have been people living in Aleppo since the 6th millennium BC.

places than and now

Santa Monica Pier Now

The famous Carousel was constructed in 1922, on Pleasure Pier, and has forty four hand-carved horses. In 1983, swells caused by a harsh winter storm completely destroyed the lower deck of the pier and nearly a third of the pier was destroyed. The City of Santa Monica founded a non-profit organization in order to help rebuild the pier, called Santa Monica Pier Restoration Corporation. The Pier is a landmark that is over one hundred years old. It has been featured in many films, TV shows, video games, and music videos.

places then and now

Santa Monica Pier 1900’s

The Santa Monica Pier is a double jointed Pier in located at the end of Colorado Avenue in Santa Monica, California. The first pier, called Municipal Pier, was opened in 1909, mostly used to transport sewer pipes past the breakers. The second pier, named the Newcomb Pier but also known as the Pleasure Pier, was added in 1916 by Charles I.D. Looff and his son Arthur. The two are considered pioneers in the amusement park industry and they included attractions on the pier that are still there today.

places then and now

Ellis Island Now

The island was officially leased in 1794 and began to be fortified by the year 1795. Before it was an immigration station, the island was a military post for around 80 years. Before Ellis Island officially opened, nearly eight million immigrants were processed to New York City at Castle Garden Immigration Depot, located in Lower Manhattan, across the bay from Ellis Island. Once Ellis Island opened, it made processing immigrants through to New York City much easier in large quantities.

places than and now

Ellis Island 1900’s

Ellis Island was the gateway for immigration into the United States between the years of 1892 through until 1954. Over 12 million immigrants came through the island and was the busiest immigration inspection station in the whole country. In 1965, the island became part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument and in 1990 became a museum of immigration. Although it is often associated with New York state, the island is actually mostly located in the state of New Jersey.

places than and now

Coney Island Now

In 1880, Coney Island became the largest amusement space in the United States. There were three major amusement parks located inside of it: Luna Park, Dreamland, and also Steeplechase Park. There also used to be technological events held at Coney Island, where baby incubators, roller coasters, and electric lights as some examples of innovations that were revealed there. By 1930, there were many land fills built so that Coney Island is not actually considered an island any longer.

places than and now

Coney Island 1890’s

Coney Island is a beach, residential area, and popular entertainment destination. The first developments on Coney Island were first constructed in the 1830’s, and this decision was very controversial, since many thought the area should be preserved as a natural park. In 1829, it became a resort area. Though it is close to Manhattan but a bit far from Brooklyn, it provided the illusion of vacation getaway, even for the city folk. Vacationers came by wagon and were more often than not very wealthy.

places than and now

Mount Rushmore Now

The historical monument sees over 2 million visitors annually. In comparison, in the 1940’s, annual visitors were around 400,000 per year. It is South Dakota’s most visited attraction, and has become symbolic of the United States. Mount Rushmore National Memorial is featured in many works of fiction and films. It is often used as a cover for a secret location in fiction. It was featured famously as the location in the climactic scene of Alfred Hitchcock’s film North by Northwest. 

places than and now

Mount Rushmore 1920’s

Mount Rushmore National Memorial features sculptures that were carved into the granite of Mouth Rushmore. Mount Rushmore is a granite batholith found in Keystone, South Dakota. The sculptures are of four former presidents: George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. The memorial sculpture spans across 1278 acres and is 5725 feet above sea level. The sculpture was sculpted by artist Gutzon Borglum as well as his son Lincoln Borglum. Construction began in 1934 and was completed in 1939.

places than and now

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